Steroids use facts

This is the scenario: a guy, say age 21, becomes serious about gaining muscle. He’s 5′ 10″, 7″ wrists, 9″ ankles, average genetics for muscle size-and-proportioned. He’s played sports, but never done more than an occasional resistance workout. Now, he begins a good training-eating-and-resting program. With his genetics, he has the potential for naturally gaining 45 pounds of lean mass if he stays consistent with progressive training/proper eating for a continuous 3 to 4 years.
But, about three months after beginning his training, he starts taking steroids. He does three steroid cycles in the following 18 months, and includes proper post-cycle therapy. That entire time, he’s continuing to consistently train and eat properly. Before the end of two years, he’s gained 45 pounds of lean mass (which with steroids, by the way, is not necessarily typical but neither improbable). At that point, he permanently quits using steroids, but he does continue properly training and eating for another two years. At the end of four years, he carries the same 45 pounds of lean mass.

From the 1950s into the 1970s, both rumors and facts of performance-enhancing drug use combined to increase actual use. Many athletes seemed to believe they had to use in order to remain competitive. Those athletes who require bulk and strength to be competitive, like bodybuilders, football players, and shotput throwers, were the first to abuse anabolic-androgenic steroids. During the 1970's demand for anabolic-androgenic steroids grew as athletes in speed-dependent sports discovered some of the potential benefits to using anabolic-androgenic steroids. For one thing, the drugs allow athletes to train harder because muscle strains and tears repair themselves faster.

Steroids use facts

steroids use facts


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